Sustainability and High-Performance

seawater HVAC

Green Buildings

By the Sea

Trends in Green (Sustainable Innovations On Campus)

Sustainability in the Culinary Arts

sustainable facilities

Green Buildings

Leading the Way in Sustainability

Green Campus and an acceptable ROI

Business (Campus Spaces)

Tipping the Scales

School administrators walk a tightrope, balancing their desire for a green campus with the need for an acceptable ROI. Here are three examples of how campuses strike that balance — or, in one case, not worry about it at all.

Smart Commuting

Trends in Green (Sustainable Innovations On Campus)

Smart Commuting

The University of Alabama at Birmingham ranks high in ride-sharing.

sustainability in restroom and locker room renovations

Facilities (Campus Spaces)

Satisfaction in the Restroom (and Locker Room)

Here's how two campuses are satisfying administrators by saving money and satisfying students by increasing sustainability in their restroom and locker room renovations.

Facilities (Managing Assets)

Vampire Power Load

Thoughts about the silent consumption of energy on campus.

Trends in Green (Sustainable Innovations on Campus)


Wesleyan University’s student-designed permaculture garden blooms to life.

Changing History

Something old, something new? That may work great in weddings, but how about campus renovations? In constructing new buildings, assuring good indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a basic consideration. But when it comes to renovating older facilities, special efforts must often be taken to apply modern standards in acoustics, daylighting, thermal comfort, and air quality.

Consider Your Energy Procurement Options

Reducing energy consumption is hugely beneficial, and nearly everyone is practicing good kW-cutting habits. But the second most direct route to decreasing energy costs is often overlooked: managing the energy purchase itself. The largest barrier to purchasing energy at lower prices: understanding the deregulated energy markets.

Green Haven

Everybody loves the idea of creating a clean, green world and passing that world on to future generations. People recycle competitively, monitor energy usage dashboards, and approach LEED certification with gusto. Security, on the other hand, is reactive. Most individuals don’t really consider it until an event brings safety to the forefront. Yet both must co-exist on today’s college campuses even though they may be at odds.

Green From the Ground Up

Regardless of the factors driving the continued market focus on environmentally sustainable construction strategies, we have noted some recurring trends that continue to be popular. The following sections will briefly note each of these trends and some of the unique opportunities of their implementation.

Using Partnerships to Build Green

Given that an investment in a LEED building is 40 to 50 years or longer, a related investment in management and maintenance will also run for many decades. Unfortunately, maintenance is often not adequately considered in advance, and when budgets tighten, deferring building maintenance can seem like an attractive option to universities who are trying to stretch their dollars. So how does a cash-strapped public institution pay for green construction and maintenance?

Turning Risk Into Resilience

Higher education has already taken a leadership role in climate mitigation — that is, preventing climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions — as displayed by the 660 signatory campuses of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) who have collectively reduced net carbon emissions by 25 percent in just five years. Now, higher education must take the lead in climate adaptation — preparing for and responding to the impacts of climate change.

Warming a Campus With Wood

Longwood has practiced sustainability by heating with biomass fuel (sawdust) for over 30 years. Longwood is the only public institution of higher education in Virginia and one of only two state agencies that burns biomass for heating fuel. Current annual energy savings are more than $4.9M when compared with burning oil, which the University used as its fuel source before switching to biomass.

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